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2015 KARL BARTH CONFERENCE PROFILES




Richard Bauckam  

Richard Bauckham

Richard Bauckham is biblical scholar and theologian whose publications have ranged over many areas and subfields, including the theology of Jürgen Moltmann, Christology (both New Testament and systematic), eschatology, the New Testament books of Revelation, James, 2 Peter and Jude, Jewish and Christian apocalyptic literature, the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, the New Testament Apocrypha, the relatives of Jesus, the early Jerusalem church, the Bible and contemporary issues, and biblical and theological approaches to environmental issues. He served as the Professor of New Testament Studies at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland until 2007. Since 2007 he has worked as an independent scholar and lecturer.

In recent years much of his work has focused on Jesus and the Gospels. His best known works are Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony (2006), God Crucified: Monotheism and Christology in the New Testament (1998), and The Bible and Ecology (2010). As well as technical scholarship and writing aimed at students and those with some theological background, he has also written accessible books for a wider readership, of which the best known is At the Cross: Meditations on People Who Were There (1999), which he co-wrote with Trevor Hart. A recent book is Jesus: A Very Short Introduction (2011), published in Oxford University Press's Very Short Introduction series, and providing a historical account of Jesus for the general reader.


Dr. Karlfried Froehlich  

Dr. Karlfried Froehlich

Dr. Karlfried Froehlich, Benjamin B. Warfield Professor Emeritus of Ecclesiastical History

Dr. Karlfried Froehlich, son of a Lutheran minister, received an M.A. degree from Drew University in 1961 and his doctorate in Theology summa cum laude from the University of Basel, Switzerland, in 1963. From 1960-1967 he taught New Testament and church history at Drew, and joined the faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary in 1968 where he held the Benjamin B. Warfield chair of Ecclesiastical History from 1982 to 1992. Dr. Froehlich has lectured widely in the United States and abroad. In 1995 he delivered the Hein-Fry Lectures in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and in 1997 the Warfield Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary. His special interest is the history of biblical interpretation, especially in the Middle Ages, Christian iconography, and ecumenism.

A lay theologian in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), Dr. Froehlich has been active in church work on many levels. He was a member of the American Lutheran-Roman Catholic Dialogue team from 1970-1990, of the U.S. Lutheran-Reformed Conversations from 1988 to 1992, and has participated in numerous national and international consultations. He is a member of the American Society of Church History, of the Mediaeval Academy of America, and of the American Theological Society where he was president in 1995. His publications include Understanding the New Testament (with H.C. Kee and F.W.Young, 1965 and 1973), Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church (Fortress Press, 1984), a four-volume edition of the Latin Bible with the standard medieval commentary, the Glossa ordinaria, 1992, The Bible as Word of God in a Post-Modern Age (with T.E. Fretheim; 1998), and Sensing the Scriptures: Aminadab's Chariot and the Predicament of Biblical Interpretation, 2014. A volume of his essays, entitled Biblical Interpretation from the Church Fathers to the Reformation was published in 2010 as vol. CS951 of Ashgate's Variorum Series.


Beverly Roberts Gaventa  

Beverly Roberts Gaventa

Beverly Roberts Gaventa is Distinguished Professor of New Testament Interpretation at Baylor University, as well as Helen H.P. Manson Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis Emerita at Princeton Theological Seminary. In addition to numerous articles, reviews, and lectionary resources, Dr. Gaventa has written Our Mother Saint Paul (Westminster John Knox, 2007), The Acts of the Apostles (Abingdon, 2003), I and II Thessalonians (Westminster John Knox, 1998), Mary: Glimpses of the Mother of Jesus (University of South Carolina, 1995; Fortress, 1999), and From Darkness to Light: Aspects of Conversion in the New Testament (Fortress, 1986). She has also edited many volumes, the most recent of which are Apocalyptic Paul (Baylor University Press, 2013), and The New Interpreter's Bible One Volume Commentary (with David Peterson; Abingdon, 2010). Her current project is a commentary for the New Testament Library on Paul's letter to the Romans.

Dr. Gaventa is a member of the Society of Biblical Litera­ture, where she has served in a variety of leadership roles. She is also a member of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas, the Catholic Biblical Association, Duodecim Theological Society, and the American Theological Society. Dr. Gaventa has served on the editorial boards of a number of scholarly journals and is an editor-at-large for Christian Century. She has lectured widely in the U.S. as well as in Canada, Europe, South Africa, and Australia.


Eric Gregory  

Eric Gregory

Eric Gregory is Professor of Religion at Princeton University. He is the author of Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship (University of Chicago Press, 2008), and various articles related to his interests in ethics, theology, political and legal theory, and the role of religion in public life. In 2007 he was awarded Princeton's President's Award for Distinguished Teaching. A graduate of Harvard College, he earned an M.Phil. and Diploma in Theology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, and his doctorate in Religious Studies from Yale University. He has received fellowships from the Erasmus Institute, University of Notre Dame, the Safra Foundation Center for Ethics, Harvard University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and The Tikvah Center for Law & Jewish Civilization at New York University School of Law. Among his current projects is a book tentatively titled, What Do We Owe Strangers? Globalization and the Good Samaritan, which examines secular and religious perspectives on global justice. At Princeton at large, he sits with the executive committees of the University Center for Human Values, the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities, and the University Public Lectures Committee.


Dr. Willie James Jennings  

Dr. Willie James Jennings

Dr. Willie James Jennings is currently Associate Professor of Theology and Black Church Studies at Duke University Divinity School. For many years, Dr. Jennings served as the Academic Dean of the Divinity School. Dr. Jennings was born and raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Dr. Jennings received his B.A. in Religion and Theological Studies from Calvin College (1984), his M.Div. (Master of Divinity degree) from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena California, and his Ph.D. degree from Duke University. Dr. Jennings who is a systematic theologian teaches in the areas of theology, black church and cultural studies, as well as post-colonial and race theory. The author of numerous articles, Dr. Jennings's recent work The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race published by Yale University Press, won the 2011 American Academy of Religion award for best book and is now becoming a standard text read in colleges, seminaries, and universities. In addition to being a frequent lecturer at colleges, universities, and seminaries, Dr. Jennings is also a regular workshop leader at pastor conferences. He is also a consultant for the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion, and for the Association of Theological Schools. He serves along with his wife, the Reverend Joanne L. Browne Jennings as an associate minister at the Mount Level Baptist Church in Durham, North Carolina. For many years, Dr. Jennings served along with Rev. Joanne Jennings as interim pastors for several Presbyterian and Baptist churches in North Carolina and they are the parents of two wonderful daughters, Njeri and Safiya Jennings.


Paul Dafydd Jones  

Paul Dafydd Jones

Paul Dafydd Jones is Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and co-director of the Virginia Center for the Study of Religion at the University of Virginia. He is author of The Humanity of Christ: Christology in Karl Barth's Church Dogmatics (T&T Clark) and numerous articles and chapters. He is working on two major projects at present: the Oxford Handbook of Karl Barth (Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2015/16), coedited with Paul Nimmo (University of Aberdeen), and a constructive work entitled Patience: A Theological Exploration.


Bruce Lindley McCormack  

Bruce Lindley McCormack

Bruce Lindley McCormack, Princeton Seminary's Charles Hodge Professor of Systematic Theology, earned his Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary. He also holds an M.Div. from Nazarene Theological Seminary and an honorary doctorate of theology from the Friedrich Schiller Universitat in Jena, Germany. A Presbyterian, McCormack is interested in the history of modern theology, from Schleiermacher and Hegel through Karl Barth. His first book, Karl Barth's Critically Realistic Dialectical Theology: Its Genesis and Development 1909-1936 is considered to be a paradigmatic work of intellectual history in the field of Barth studies. His courses cover Schleiermacher's Glaubenslehre and the doctrine of atonement in the Christian tradition. He is a member of the General Assembly committee commissioned to write a new catechism for the Presbyterian Church (USA) and has been a member of the panel on doctrine for the Church of Scotland. A member of the Karl Barth-Stiftung in Basel, Switerzland, he is North American editor of the Zeitschrift fuer Dialektische Theologie, published in Holland.


Daniel L. Migliore  

Daniel L. Migliore

Daniel L. Migliore is the Charles Hodge Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary where he taught for forty-seven years. An ordained minister of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), he is the author of numerous articles and books, including Called to Freedom (1980); Rachel's Cry: Prayer of Lament and Rebirth of Hope, with Kathleen Billman (1999); The Power of God and the gods of Power (2008); Faith Seeking Understanding: An Introduction to Christian Theology (3rd ed., 2014), and most recently, Philippians and Philemon (2014). Migliore is also editor of the volume Commanding Grace: Studies in Karl Barth's Ethics (2010), and is responsible for designing the Princeton Karl Barth Conference to be held in June, 2015 on the theme, "Karl Barth and the Gospels: Interpreter of Gospel Texts." While an active member of the Princeton faculty, Migliore served at various times as Chairman of the Department of Theology and as editor of The Princeton Seminary Bulletin. In 2008-2009 he served as President of the American Theological Society. In his retirement Migliore continues his research and writing in his academic specialization, the theology and ethics of Karl Barth, and preaches and teaches at conferences and in local congregations.


Jürgen Moltmann  

Jürgen Moltmann

Jürgen Moltmann, Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology at the University of Tübingen in Germany, is one of the most widely read theologians of the second half of the twentieth century. Moltmann was born in Hamburg, Germany, on 8 April 1926. He states that he grew up in a secular home, without significant Christian influence. As a boy he wanted to study science and mathematics. However in 1944, his education was interrupted when he was drafted by the German army. Moltmann was sent to the front lines in the Belgian forest. He surrendered in 1945 to the first British soldier he met.

For the next few years (1945–1948), he was confined as a prisoner of war and moved from camp to camp. First held in Belgium, he was later moved to Scotland and then to northern England. His experience as a POW had a powerful impact on his life, as it was in the camps that he had time to reflect upon the devastating nature of the Second World War. It was also in the camps that Moltmann met Christian chaplains, was given the New Testament and Psalms to read, and had his first introduction to Christian theology. Moltmann reflects about the war experience: ‘In July 1943 I was an air force auxiliary in a battery in the center of Hamburg, and barely survived the fire storm which the Royal Air Force's "Operation Gomorrah" let loose on the eastern part of the city. The friend standing next to me at the firing predictor was torn to pieces by the bomb that left me unscathed. That night I cried out to God for the first time: "My God, where are you?" And the question "Why am I not dead too?" has haunted me ever since'.

When the war was over, Moltmann returned to his home in Hamburg. As a result of his reading the Bible and theological texts in the POW camps and attending the Student Christian Movement conference in the summer of 1947 with a group of POWs, Moltmann decided to pursue theological training. He received his doctorate from the University of Göttingen, under the direction of Otto Weber in 1952. From 1952 to 1957 Moltmann was the pastor of the Evangelical Church of Bremen-Wasserhorst.

In 1958 Moltmann became a theology teacher at an academy in Wuppertal that was operated by the Confessing Church and in 1963 he joined the theological faculty of Bonn University. He was appointed Professor of Systematic Theology at the University of Tübingen in 1967 and remained there until his retirement in 1994. From 1963 to 1983, Moltmann was a member of the Faith and Order Committee of the World Council of Churches. From 1983 to 1993, Moltmann was the Robert W. Woodruff Distinguished Visiting Professor of Systematic Theology at Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. He delivered the Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh in 1984–1985. Moltmann won the 2000 Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion for his book The Coming of God: Christian Eschatology.

Moltmann married the feminist theologian Elisabeth Wendel in 1952; they have four daughters.

Moltmann has contributed many books to the field of theology, including Theology of Hope (1964), The Crucified God (1972), Man (1974), The Church in the Power of the Spirit (1975), The Trinity and the Kingdom of God (1980), God in Creation (1985), The Way of Jesus Christ (1989), The Spirit of Life (1991), Theology of Hope: On the Ground and the Implications of a Christian Eschatology (1993), The Coming of God (1995), How I Have Changed: Reflections on Thirty Years of Theology (1997), The Source of Life (1997), God for a Secular Society (1998), Experiences in Theology (2000), Science and Wisdom (2003) and In the End—The Beginning: The Life of Hope (2004). Books coauthored with his wife, Dr. Elisabeth Moltmann-Wendel, include Humanity in God (1983), God-His and Hers (1991), and Passion for God: Theology in Two Voices (2003).

Bio taken from http://www.giffordlectures.org/Author.asp?AuthorID=217


Fleming Rutledge  

Fleming Rutledge

The Rev. Fleming Rutledge, one of the first women to be ordained to the priesthood of the Episcopal Church, is recognized in the United States, Canada, and the UK as a lecturer, preacher, and teacher of other preachers. Her published sermon collections have met with wide acclaim across denominational lines. Her most recent collection is And the Lord Spoke to Abraham: Preaching the Old Testament, and her major work The Crucifixion will be published in the fall of 2015. Mrs. Rutledge received her Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York in 1975. She spent twenty-two years in parish ministry in New York City and its environs. She has been married for fifty-four years to Reginald E. (Dick) Rutledge, a marketing consultant. They have two grown daughters and two grandchildren.